Turbine Inlet Cooling Systems Market by Technology (Inlet Fogging Systems, Mechanical Chillers, and Wet Compression Systems) – Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends and Forecast 2014 – 2022

Rising demand for energy is driving the construction of new power plants globally. Despite the prevailing economic slowdown, demand for power is expected to grow on account of urbanization and rise in population. The drop in plant efficiency during summer seasons raises concerns related to blackouts and power outages. The solution to such problems is capacity additions. However, capacity addition either through the construction of new power plants or addition of extra turbines is both capital-intensive and time-consuming. Restricted by both time and economic constraints, power companies and turbine manufacturers are now opting to install turbine inlet cooling systems. Turbine inlet cooling systems provide cost-effective power augmentation. Mechanical chillers and evaporative technologies, such as inlet fogging and wet compression systems, are widely adopted by power producers and turbine manufacturers to boost turbine capacities, especially during the summer seasons. 

The research study is designed to analyze and estimate the market for turbine inlet cooling systems globally both in terms of volume (Units) and revenue (USD Million). The global market for turbine inlet cooling systems has been broadly segmented on the basis of technology and geography. The market report only addresses three specific inlet cooling technologies: inlet fogging, mechanical chillers, and wet compression. These technologies are used to boost plant efficiency, especially in regions with hot climates. Utilization of inlet fogging technology reduces the inlet air temperature through spraying of small water droplets. Wet compression units are generally used in conjunction with other inlet cooling technologies to provide additional cooling to boost plant efficiency. Mechanical chillers can attain greater temperature reduction in inlet air than most of the other available technologies.

In this research study, the turbine inlet cooling market has been segmented at a granular level, geographically. The global market has been segmented geographically into North America, Europe, Asia Pacific, and Rest of the World (RoW). Each of these regional segments has been further sub-divided into its constituent country-wise segments. A total of 12 sub-segments have been drawn from the four regions, which comprise eight unique country-specific analyses. The countries included under the scope of the report are China, Japan, and Australia in Asia Pacific; the U.S. in North America; Italy and Turkey in Europe; and Iran and GCC countries in RoW. The report features a detailed regional segmentation with market growth forecast for the 2014-2022 period. Similar detailed projections have also been provided for the technology segment. For this market study, 2013 has been taken as the base year, while all forecasts are for the 2014-2022 period.

This report includes key market dynamics affecting the demand for turbine inlet cooling systems globally. As part of our market dynamics analysis, we have analyzed the market drivers, market restraints, and market opportunities. The report also provides a detailed analysis of the global turbine inlet cooling systems market with the help of Porter’s Five Forces model. The Porter’s Five Forces analysis aids in understanding the five major forces that affect the industry structure and demand for turbine inlet cooling systems globally. The forces analyzed are the bargaining power of buyers, bargaining power of suppliers, threat of new entrants, threat of substitutes, and degree of competition. The report also includes a glimpse of the global turbine inlet cooling systems value chain. The interaction and roles of various stakeholders starting from technology development and manufacturing to the deployment and final end-use have been elucidated in detail. The market attractiveness analysis involves benchmarking and ranking of each region on the basis of numerous parameters. The parameters selected are likely to have a pronounced effect on the demand for turbine inlet cooling systems in that region, both currently and in the near future.

Key participants in the global turbine inlet cooling systems market include American Moistening Company Inc., Caldwell Energy Company Inc., Cat Pumps Inc., Humifrio S.L., Mee Industries Inc., Score Energy Limited, Siemens AG, UTC Technologies Company, Camfil AB, and Baltec IES Pty. Ltd. This report provides an overview of these companies, followed by their financial revenues, business strategies, and recent developments

** Source: Transparency Market Research Press Release 2015-10-23

Thermal Storage Market To Witness Growth As Energy Demand Surges Worldwide

GrandViewResearch.com has announced the addition of “Global Thermal Storage Market Analysis And Segment Forecasts To 2022” Market Research report to their Database

Global thermal storage market has grown tremendously on account of the rising world population and corresponding demand for energy. Thermal storages provide a sustainable alternative to non-renewable energy resources’ usage. Temporary hoarding of heat facilitated by thermal storages is anticipated to remain a key driving factor for the global market expansion. Global energy usage is predominantly shifting towards renewable energy sources on account of rising energy costs, depletion of fossil fuels and growing importance of environmental protection and conservation. These dynamics are further expected to encourage the global thermal storages market growth.

Full research report on Global Thermal Storage Market with detailed figures and charts available at:

http://www.grandviewresearch.com/industry-analysis/thermal-storage-market

As per technology, thermal storages can be categorized into sensible, thermochemical and latent heat storages. Sensible heat predominantly emerged as the largest segment until 2014; however it is forecasted to lose market share over the forecast period on account of limited storage capacity per volume. Thermochemical and latent storages are projected to acquire larger market share throughout the forecast period on account of higher energy density. Thermal storages end-use markets can be further classified into utilities, commercial, industrial and residential segments. Commercial and industrial segments have dominated the market as a result of rising demand for backup power solutions and increasing energy prices.

Get more information on Global Thermal Storage Market or request for TOC of this research report at:

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Geographically, Europe is expected to lead the thermal storage market in terms of capacity installation owing to strong regional emphasis on energy efficiency coupled with rising demand for renewable energy resources. Huge investments have been made towards development of sustainable energy resources in Europe, especially in the UK. North America as a mature market is expected to achieve moderate market growth during the forecasted period. Furthermore, rising need for sustainable and efficient development towards future is expected to drive the growth in Asia Pacific regions. Countries in Middle East & Africa such as Algeria, Jordan, Morocco, Egypt and Tunisia have also set guidelines to achieve green energy targets in order to reduce dependence on conventional energy resources. This trend is expected to further strengthen ME&A market growth over the forecast period.

Key players in the market include CALMAC, Strata-Therm, Chicago Bridge & Iron Company (CB&I), Goss Engineering Inc., EVAPCO Inc., Baltimore Aircoil Co., Abengoa Solar, BrightSource Energy, Inc., Caldwell Energy, Burns & McDonnell, Steffes Corporation, Ice Lings, and TAS Energy.

View more reports of this category by Grand View Research at:

http://www.grandviewresearch.com/industry/construction-and-utilities

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Performance Enhancement Of GT 24 With Wet Compression Technology

by

Sanjeev Jolly, P.E.
Scott Cloyd
Caldwell Energy Company
Louisville, Kentucky, USA

ABSTRACT

The performance effects of applying wet compression to an advanced frame combustion turbine, the Alstorm GT-24, are presented and contrasted to the performance of mature Frame combustion turbines that have been operated with wet compression systems for many years. The performance comparisons are based on combustion turbines that are equipped with evaporative cooling systems and dry low NOx combustion systems. The paper addresses the relative changes in compressor and turbine operating conditions and how these affect component life. Wet compression is not just haphazardly spraying water into the compressor inlet; care must be taken as there is an expensive and high precision turbine downstream. The system must be properly integrated with the turbine and turbine controls and any issues or concerns with wet compression must be thoroughly evaluated and addressed. The paper also reviews current assessment of applying wet compression systems to combustion turbines and provide performance and economic comparisons to alternative power augmentation technologies for these products.

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    Direct Spray System For Inlet Air Cooling W 501 B5

    by

    Sanjeev Jolly, P.E.
    Joseph Nitzken, P.E.
    Donald Shepherd
    Caldwell Energy & Environmental, Inc.
    Louisville, Kentucky, USA

    ABSTRACT

    Cooling the inlet air utilizing water spray system can increase the performance of a combustion turbine during hot weather. In a direct spray system, water is added to the sir stream in the form of fine droplets. As the droplets absorb the latent heat of vaporization, heat is removed from the air stream thereby reducing it’s temperature. the objective of this paper is to discuss a direct spray system for cooling inlet air for Florida Power & Light’s Westinghouse 501 B5 combustion turbine at the Putnam plant. The fogging is done in multiple stages – an external zone and an internal zone to control the humidity to a precise level. An overspray zone has been added for additional power augmentation. The water is sprayed into the incoming air stream through impingement nozzles placed at the cross-section of the incoming air. The size of the water droplets varies with the nozzle dimensions and water pressure. It is important to limit the size of the water droplets in order to allow for vaporization of water in a relatively short distance, thus minimizing water carryover and droplet agglomeration. Therefore selection of the nozzle type, their arrangement and placement, and the water discharge pressure is very important to control the stringent compressor inlet air requirements. These design requirements and actual cooling system performance are discussed in detail in this paper.

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      Peaking Capacity Enhancement Of ABB 11N1 With Thermal Energy Storage

      by

      Sanjeev Jolly, P.E.
      Joseph Nitzkin, P.E.
      Donald Shepherd,
      Cladwell Energy & Environmental, Inc.
      Louisville, Kentucky, USA

      Douglas T. Eberlin, P.E.
      Wisconsin Electric
      Milwaukee, Wisconsin

      ABSTRACT

      Many electrical utilities are experiencing increased seasonal demand due to air conditioning use. Current air quality rules and regulatory changes in the industry favor the installation of combustion turbines (CT) for new generation capacity. Ironically, CT output declines as ambient temperature increases. As the output of a combustion turbine degrades during hot weather conditions, warm ambient air to the compressor inlet can be chilled to restore lost capacity. For a thermal energy storage (TES) system, a refrigeration system is utilized to build a cold energy reserve and this reserve is used to cool inlet air during peak hours to enhance turbine capacity. Typically, a TES system can be installed at half the cost of installing a new turbine. Two such systems were installed at Wisconsin Electric’s (WE) Concord and Paris Generating Stations, each having four ABB 11N1 combustion turbines running in simple cycle mode, This paper discusses the feasibility study and design for a TES based inlet chilling system to provide peaking capacity enhancement for these ABB 11n1 machines. The system design is based on cooling the inlet air for 4 hours a day, 5 days a week. Each of these systems includes a 3,200 ton refrigerant plant, two 2 1/4 million gallon tanks, and 2,500 tons of ice-making capacity. The instantaneous cooling load for each set of 4 turbines is 16,700 tons. With this Combustion Turbine Inlet Air Cooling System (CTIAC), a total gain of more than 112 MW (approximately 17%) was expected for the two plants, making it the world’s largest inlet air cooling system. Finally, the system performance is discussed during summer operation.

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        Application Of Wet Compression For Aeroderivitive Combustion Turbines

        by

        Sanjeev Jolly, P.E.
        Scott Cloyd
        Caldwell Energy Company
        Louisville, KY

        James Hinrichs
        PURENERGY LLC
        San Diego, CA

        ABSTRACT

        While the application of wet compression to boost turbine capacity has been successfully applied to industrial frame machine, only recently has this technology been applied to aeroderivatives like the LM-2500. The principles of applying wet compression are similar to the industrial frame machines, but there are subtle differences that affect the design of the spray system, inlet duct modification, control system integration, and turbine protective devices. This paper discusses design differences and the performance enhancement of an LM-2500PE that was retrofit with wet compression at PurEnergy’s Kingsburg Congeneration Facility in Kingsburg, California. The LM-2500 is an interesting application because the compressor and power turbine are on different shafts which introduce speed and pressure variations between the gas generator and power turbine that affect the performance augmentation resulting from wet compression. Operating limits for surge and speed were also encountered which were not previously encountered on the single shaft industrial frames. The incremental performance per gallon of water is notably different from the industrial turbines which will be shown for comparison of the augmentation results along with a comparison of wet compression to other power augmentation technologies.

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          Impact Of Heat Rate, Emissions, And Reliability From The Application Of Wet Compression On Combustion Turbines

          by

          Donald W. Shepherd
          Caldwell Energy Company
          Louisville, KY

          Donald Fraser
          Siemens Westinghouse
          Orlando, Florida

          ABSTRACT:

          Wet compression technology has been successfully installed on over 40 combustion turbines around the world. Wet compression systems have been justified due to the significant power gains achieved. What has not been discussed is the impact this technology has on the efficiency (heat rate), emissions and reliability of the combustion turbine.

          One significant advantage of wet compression systems over other turbine inlet cooling power augmentation technologies is that gains are not restricted by ambient conditions. As a result, the megawatt-hours during the year are much higher than with any other technology, resulting in quicker payback and maximum net present value. Another benefit is that the application of wet compression is complementary to other turbine inlet cooling technologies like evaporative cooling, fogging or chilling. There are also benefits relating to heat rate, emissions and reliability for a properly designed and installed system.

          This paper presents computational and field data that illustrates that there is more to gain than merely addition power output. Experience will be drawn from all types of combustion turbines: aeroderivitive, mature and advanced. The information will be presented in a format that will accurately depict all the benefits of wet compression technology allowing users to fully understand these benefits.

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            Wet Compression – A Powerful Means Of Enhancing Combustion Turbine Capacity

            by

            Sanjeev Jolly, P.E.
            Caldwell Energy & Environmental, Inc.
            Louisville, Kentucky, USA

            ABSTRACT

            Wet compression is a patented process that increases the capacity of a combustion turbine (CT) by as much as 15 to 25% by purposely injecting water droplets into a compressor inlet (AKA – overspray, high fogging or supersaturation). The increase in capacity is primarily due to reduction in compressor work and ability for additional firing in the combustor, and secondarily due to increase in mass flowrate. This paper presents thermodynamic benefits of wet compression, the risks associated with applying wer compression systems to a CT, the steps that were taken to integrate and validate the system at a recent installation, and performance results of the system application on a GE Frame 6B combustion turbine, in which power output was augmented by 9%.

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              Inlet Air Cooling For A Frame 7EA Based Combined Cycle Power Plant

              Presented at Power-Gen International
              Las Vegas, Nevada
              1997

              by

              Sanjeev Jolly, P. E.
              Donald W. Shepherd
              Joseph A. Nitzken, P.E.
              Caldwell Energy & Environmental, Inc.
              Louisville, KY

              Randall B. Cummings, P.E.
              F.J. Linkous, Jr., P.E.
              Lockwood Greene
              Atlanta, GA

              ABSTRACT

              Refrigerated inlet air cooling is one of the most effective ways to increase the capacity of combustion turbines (CTs) during high ambient temperatures, yet the application has not received wide acceptance for large industrial type turbines. There are more than one hundred installations in which inlet air chilling is successfully applied to aeroderivatives, but only a handful of instances for large industrial type combustion turbines. The benefits are equally applicable to these machines as they are to aeroderivatives. The capacity enhancement will be even more cost effective for the new generation of CTs which are fired to higher temperatures and use less air per kW produced. The objective of this paper is to discuss the effects of chilling the inlet air for a GE Frame 7EA CT. An inlet air cooling system was installed at the Cogen Technologies' Camden Cogen facility during the spring of 1997. The cooling system consists of the latest chiller technology using non-ozone-depleting refrigerant R134a. This paper will address how the turbine capacity could be cost effectively increased during the summer months when demand is usually the highest. Several issues including the feasibility study, system description and its performance at various temperature/humidity conditions will be discussed in this paper. Field data shall be used to illustrate the benefits of inlet air cooling for turbine capacity enhancement.

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                Wet Compression Technology For Combustion Turbines Application On 7EA

                by

                Donald Shepherd
                V.P. Mechanical/Electrical Engineering
                Caldwell Energy Company Caldwell Energy Company
                Louisville, KY

                Wet Compression

                • What is the goal of all Turbine Inlet Cooling Technologies?

                • Increase output and Efficiency

                • How do the technologies do this?

                – Reduce the inlet temperature

                – Increase the mass flow into the machine

                – Decreases the compressor discharge temperature

                Wet Compression Technology (WCT) Genesis

                • Water Wash Systems

                – Used for years to 'secretly' increase

                Combustion Turbine Output

                • Early 90's Realizations

                • Several Patents Issued

                – Others Pending

                – Prudent to License Prudent to License

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